Biology

Large Mammals Make Soil More Fertile in Tropical Forests (Biology)

The White-lipped peccary Tayassu pecari is a boar-like hoofed mammal found throughout Central and South America. These animals roam the forest in bands of 50 to 100 individuals, eating a wide variety of foods. In Brazil’s Atlantic Rainforest, they prefer the fruit of the jussara palm Euterpe edulis. A study conducted by scientists at São Paulo State University… Continue reading Large Mammals Make Soil More Fertile in Tropical Forests (Biology)

Computer Science, Engineering

A New Tool to Facilitate Quicker, Error-free Software Design (Computer / Engineering)

UOC-led research presents new software model verification technique. The tool permits the early detection of errors at any point during the modelling process, not just on completion, as is the case now. Any building project requires the formulation of a series of initial plans prior to starting construction to serve as a basis and guide for the… Continue reading A New Tool to Facilitate Quicker, Error-free Software Design (Computer / Engineering)

Medicine

Need to Reduce Work-related Stress? It’s a Walk in the Park (Medicine)

Study from the University of Tsukuba finds that taking regular walks in forests and greenspaces may be connected with workers' stress-coping abilities Work causes so much stress that it's become a global public health issue. Stress's impact on mental and physical health can also hurt productivity and result in economic loss. A new study now… Continue reading Need to Reduce Work-related Stress? It’s a Walk in the Park (Medicine)

Biology

A Highly Sensitive Technique for Measuring the State Of a Cytoskeleton (Biology)

A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was generally made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure cytoskeleton organization. The researchers expect it… Continue reading A Highly Sensitive Technique for Measuring the State Of a Cytoskeleton (Biology)

Archaeology

The End of Domestic Wine in 17th Century Japan (Archeology)

September 1632 document likely shows the order for the last batch of Japanese wine in the Edo period. Researchers from Kumamoto University (Japan) have found an Edo period document that clearly indicates the Hosokawa clan, rulers of the Kokura Domain (modern-day Fukuoka Prefecture), completely stopped producing wine in 1632, the year before the shogunate ordered… Continue reading The End of Domestic Wine in 17th Century Japan (Archeology)

Material science

Conductive Nature in Crystal Structures Revealed at Magnification of 10 Million Times (Material Science)

In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows—transparency and conductivity. Using advanced analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at a magnification of 10 million times, University of Minnesota researchers were able… Continue reading Conductive Nature in Crystal Structures Revealed at Magnification of 10 Million Times (Material Science)

Neuroscience

T Cells Linked to Myelin Implicated in MS-Like Disease in Monkeys (Neuroscience)

Some of the T cell epitopes targeting myelin in monkeys were the same as those found in humans with multiple sclerosis. Researchers say linking these specific cells opens the doors to developing antiviral therapies that could be useful to treat newly diagnosed cases of MS in humans. Scientists have uncovered new clues implicating a type… Continue reading T Cells Linked to Myelin Implicated in MS-Like Disease in Monkeys (Neuroscience)