Oncotarget: Estrogen Receptor α Polymorphism is Associated With Dementia (Neuroscience)

Oncotarget recently published “Estrogen receptor α polymorphism is associated with dementia in a Brazilian cohort” which reported that the growth of the elderly population is a worldwide phenomenon and it is associated with chronic diseases, including dementia.

In this scenario, the present study aimed to evaluate a possible association of estrogen receptor α polymorphisms with dementia in a Brazilian cohort.

The genotyping for the ERα PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

The ERα PvuII pp genotype was associated with a higher odds ratio for dementia (OR = 3.42, 95% CI = 1.33–8.77, p = 0.01, in a model including covariates.

A linear regression model identified significant associations of the ERα PvuII genotypes with CDR scale , β = 0.26 and p = 0.001. In conclusion, estrogen receptor α PvuII polymorphism is associated with dementia in a Brazilian cohort.

“In conclusion, estrogen receptor α PvuII polymorphism is associated with dementia in a Brazilian cohort”

Dr. Valerio Garrone Barauna from The Federal University of Espirito Santo-Department of Physiological Sciences said, “One of the most striking features of the current world’s demographic dynamics is the process of population aging, that is, the increase in the absolute number and percentage of elderly people in the population as a whole, which has occurred since 1950, but mainly during the 21st century.

One of the most striking features of the current world’s demographic dynamics is the process of population aging, that is, the increase in the absolute number and percentage of elderly people in the population as a whole, which has occurred since 1950, but mainly during the 21st century.

In relative terms, the elderly population accounted for 5.1% of the total 1950 population, rose to 6.5% by 2020 and is expected to reach 22.6% by 2100 .

Among the chronic-degenerative conditions that afflict this “new” population, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis and dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, stand out .

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, which occur with severe cognitive loss, is based on the observation of clinical data.

Biochemical and genetic studies are important for identifying markers to make diagnosis more assertive, for predicting risk of disease, and/or differential diagnosis between dementias.

The Barauna Research team concluded in their Oncotarget Research Paper that this study has some limitations.

For a better statement about this polymorphism, a larger and more heterogeneous cohort would be needed.

In addition, coexisting multiple factors are important in pathogenesis changes.

The diagnostic research relationships for potential risk factors for dementia versus current clinical application should take into account both genetic and longevity biomarkers with patients.

Diagnostic and prognostic research can no longer be exclusively based on currently used clinical tests, but rather new diagnostic protocols that involve the relevant factors.

Featured image: Analysis of multiple logistic regression for dementia using different models incluing ERα genotypes Copyright: © 2020 Magnago et al.


Reference: Magnago R. Papalino Lopes, Barauna V. Garrone, Brun B. Ferro, Lo Prete A. Cristina, Alvarenga A. Morgan, Gastalho Campos L. C., Rochette N. Felix Gomes, Rangel L. Batista Azevedo, Faria R. Alves, Santos P. Caleb Junior Lima, Silva I. Victor Estrogen receptor α polymorphism is associated with dementia in a Brazilian cohort. Oncotarget. 2020; 11: 4655-4660. Retrieved from https://www.oncotarget.com/article/27744/text/


Provided by Impact Journals LLC

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