Fire Record Shows Cultural Diffusion Took Off 400,000 Years Ago (Archeology)

Middle Pleistocene fire use: The first signal of widespread cultural diffusion in human evolution Researchers from the University of Leiden and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands propose that the first clear example of widespread cultural diffusion in human evolution occurred around 400,000 years ago. They propose this on the basis of changes in … Continue reading Fire Record Shows Cultural Diffusion Took Off 400,000 Years Ago (Archeology)

Archaeologists Reveal Origins Of Famous Stone Age Monument (Archeology)

Archaeologists from the Universities of Manchester and Cardiff have discovered the origins of Arthur’s Stone, one of the UK’s most famous Stone Age monuments. Manchester’s Professor Julian Thomas, who led the excavation, says the imposing Herefordshire tomb is linked to nearby ‘halls of the dead’, which were discovered in 2013 by a team led by … Continue reading Archaeologists Reveal Origins Of Famous Stone Age Monument (Archeology)

World’s Earliest-Known Coin Mint and Spade Coin Discovered in China (Archeology)

Archaeologists have uncovered 2,640- to 2,550-year-old clay moulds for casting spade coins as well as fragments of finished spade coins at Guanzhuang in Xingyang, Henan province, China. The technical characteristics of the moulds demonstrate that the site — which was part of the Eastern Zhou period (770-220 BCE) bronze foundry — functioned as a mint … Continue reading World’s Earliest-Known Coin Mint and Spade Coin Discovered in China (Archeology)

Scottish And Irish Researchers To Investigate Ancient Ogham Script (Archeology)

Academics from Scotland and Ireland are harnessing cutting-edge digital and 3D technologies to protect the inscriptions and transform our understanding of the ancient Celtic Ogham writing system, it was announced today. Ogham was invented over 1500 years ago and is found in the Republic of Ireland and across the four nations of Britain, and the … Continue reading Scottish And Irish Researchers To Investigate Ancient Ogham Script (Archeology)

Neanderthals Painted The Andalusian Cave of Ardales Well (Archeology)

The origin and date of the appearance of prehistoric cave art continues to be debated. Among the sites discussed, the Spanish cave of Ardales where a stalagmitic flow is colored red in places: the coloring would date almost 65,000 years¹ but part of the scientific community had until then attributed it to a natural flow of iron … Continue reading Neanderthals Painted The Andalusian Cave of Ardales Well (Archeology)

Mathematician Reveals World’s Oldest Example Of Applied Geometry (Archeology / Maths)

A UNSW mathematician has revealed the origins of applied geometry on a 3700-year-old clay tablet that has been hiding in plain sight in a museum in Istanbul for over a century. The tablet – known as Si.427 – was discovered in the late 19th century in what is now central Iraq, but its significance was … Continue reading Mathematician Reveals World’s Oldest Example Of Applied Geometry (Archeology / Maths)

Thomas Cromwell’s Tudor London Mansion Revealed in Unprecedented Detail (Archeology)

New insights come on anniversary of Cromwell’s death and ahead of the final part of the ‘Wolf Hall’ trilogy which hits West End later this year. The magnificent London mansion of Thomas Cromwell has been revealed for the first time in an artist’s impression, following a new study which examines the building in unprecedented detail. … Continue reading Thomas Cromwell’s Tudor London Mansion Revealed in Unprecedented Detail (Archeology)

Roman Road Discovered In The Venice Lagoon (Archeology)

The discovery of a Roman road submerged in the Venice Lagoon is reported in Scientific Reports this week. The findings suggest that extensive settlements may have been present in the Venice Lagoon centuries before the founding of Venice began in the fifth century. During the Roman era, large areas of the Venice Lagoon which are now submerged … Continue reading Roman Road Discovered In The Venice Lagoon (Archeology)

Why Weren’t New World Rabbits Domesticated? (Archeology)

Archaeologists find the answer in rabbit social behavior Domesticated rabbits come in all sizes and colors, including tiny Netherland Dwarfs, floppy-eared French lops, Flemish Giants, and fluffy Angoras.  These breeds belong to Europe’s only rabbit species, originally limited to the Iberian Peninsula and Southern France and used for meat and fur since the last Ice … Continue reading Why Weren’t New World Rabbits Domesticated? (Archeology)