What Would Happen If Dark Asteroid Travels Through A Star? (Cosmology)

Anirban Das and colleagues in their recent paper showed that, when dark asteroids travels through a star, it produces shock waves, which quickly propagate to the stellar surface, where it is released in the form of a transient optical, UV or X-ray emission. They also suggested how we can search and detect such signature. Their … Continue reading What Would Happen If Dark Asteroid Travels Through A Star? (Cosmology)

Novel Materials: Sound Waves Traveling Backwards (Material Science)

Researchers of the 3D Matter Made to Order Cluster of Excellence Use Rotons for Metamaterials – Nature Communications Publishes First Results Acoustic waves in gases, liquids, and solids usually travel at an almost constant speed of sound. So-called rotons are an exception: their speed of sound changes significantly with the wavelength, and it is also … Continue reading Novel Materials: Sound Waves Traveling Backwards (Material Science)

Space Travel Weakens Our Immune Systems – Now Scientists May Know Why (Biology)

Final study by UCSF astronaut points to Treg cells as the culprit Microgravity in space perturbs human physiology and is detrimental for astronaut health, a fact first realized during early Apollo missions when astronauts experienced inner ear disturbances, heart arrhythmia, low blood pressure, dehydration, and loss of calcium from their bones after their missions. One … Continue reading Space Travel Weakens Our Immune Systems – Now Scientists May Know Why (Biology)

How Coronavirus Aerosols Travel Through Our Lungs? (Medicine)

A new study led by Dr Saidul Islam from the UTS Faculty of Engineering models what happens when we inhale coronavirus aerosols. When we inhale isolated coronavirus particles, more than 65% reach the deepest region of our lungs where damage to cells can lead to low blood oxygen levels, new research has discovered, and more of … Continue reading How Coronavirus Aerosols Travel Through Our Lungs? (Medicine)

Researchers Observe New Complexity of Traveling Brain Waves in Memory Circuits (Neuroscience)

Researchers at UC San Francisco have observed a new feature of neural activity in the hippocampus – the brain’s memory hub – that may explain how this vital brain region combines a diverse range of inputs into a multi-layered memories that can later be recalled. Using a special “micro-grid” recording device developed by colleagues at … Continue reading Researchers Observe New Complexity of Traveling Brain Waves in Memory Circuits (Neuroscience)

Molecular Biologists Travel Back in Time 3 Billion Years (Biology)

A research group working at Uppsala University has succeeded in studying ‘translation factors’ – important components of a cell’s protein synthesis machinery – that are several billion years old. By studying these ancient ‘resurrected’ factors, the researchers were able to establish that they had much broader specificities than their present-day, more specialised counterparts. In order … Continue reading Molecular Biologists Travel Back in Time 3 Billion Years (Biology)

Travel Paths of Primates Show How Their Minds Work (Neuroscience)

How primates get from A to B gives vital information about their cognitive evolution, say researchers in a new study looking at the travel paths of animals in the wild. Using data from 164 wild primate populations, the global survey examines the mental abilities that primates, including ourselves, use to know where and when to … Continue reading Travel Paths of Primates Show How Their Minds Work (Neuroscience)

Time Travel to a Warm Arctic (Archeology)

An international team of scientists led by Gina Moseley from the Department of Geology at the University of Innsbruck presents the very first analysis of sediments from a cave in northeast Greenland, that cover a time period between about 588,000 to 549,000 years ago. This interval was warmer and wetter than today, the cave deposits … Continue reading Time Travel to a Warm Arctic (Archeology)

Long-term Space Travelers Will Need High-intensity Exercise to Protect Heart Health (Medicine)

Research Highlights: Sustained low-intensity exercise does not completely counteract the effects of weightlessness on the heart muscle, which will atrophy over time in a gravity-free environment. Short bursts of repeated high-intensity activity during shorter space missions may be more successful in keeping the heart healthy. As NASA seeks to build a lunar outpost, visit Mars … Continue reading Long-term Space Travelers Will Need High-intensity Exercise to Protect Heart Health (Medicine)