Tag Archives: #hotsprings

Why Chinese Look Like Chinese? Indians Look like Indians?…… Well, I Have An Answer (Biology)

Did we look different from each other, right from the past..?? Today by just looking at faces we can differentiate if the person belongs to China, India, Russia etc.. But what if I say, we all look same in the past.. Yeah its true, there were no countries, no religion, no discrimination, no hate.. We used to live with each other happily like a family.. Wanna know lets travel back 3 lakh years before..

We all used to live in Africa at that time. The environment was warm and naturally rich. We all looked same. Our only objective was ‘survival’. As one couldn’t able to survive alone, we used to live and hunt in groups and stay at one place. Earth was actually the heaven at that time as there were no racism. And yeah, our ancestors prefer grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on, at least 2 lakh years ago.

These beds consisting of sheaves of grass of the broad-leafed Panicoideae subfamily were placed near the back of the cave on ash layers. The layers of ash was used to protect our ancestors against crawling insects while sleeping. Our ancestors also used hot springs as a cooking resource to boil fresh kills, long before humans are thought to have used fire as a controlled source for cooking.

But around 1.3 lakh years before, an interglacial period changed everything. Climate of the earth started increasing rapidly and this started melting icy routes which goes out of Africa. So, some of our ancestors decided to migrate to other countries, while others decided to stay in Africa. Our migrating ancestors took only required food with them, while shared remaining with others. This act of kindness we call today, ‘Law of Sharing’.

Out of Africa, our ancestors went to levantine regions first and started spreading to Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine and Turkey.. And just after 1000 years, some of them migrated towards europe and asia. And for 40000 years, our ancestors had spread to India and China. And that’s how 4 human raeces born.

Do you know, that 4 human races? They are white/Caucasian, Mongoloid/Asian, Negroid/Black, and Australoid. According to darwin theory of evolution, Indians are the mixture of Caucasian, australiazoid and mongoloid. North India people have more caucasoin genes, South India have more Australiazoid genes. While, North East have mongoloid genes..

But what about china? Well friends, they all belongs to mongolian races. But the question is, why they have small eyes and flat faces. Friends, its not because god created them like this, that was the gift given to them by evolution through natural selection. Yeah friends, when they came to siberia from africa. It was necessary to protect eyes from snow blindness and natural selection given them low exposure eyes i.e. squinty eyes, to protect them against it..

But what about their flat facial features? You know well about the siberia’s extreme cold temperatures. In order to survive such extreme cold temperatures it is necessary to prevent heat loss. So, natural selection bought changes in their facial features and had given them extra face fat. It also helped them to eat icy-meats. Epicanthel fold is also believed to have evolved in them in order to provide defense from the extreme cold and extreme light that occur in Eurasian arctic and northern regions.

But what about Europeans? How they got their pale colour? Ancestors who were migrated to northern latitudes often don’t get enough UV to synthesize vitamin D in their skin so natural selection has favored two genetic solutions to that problem—evolving pale skin that absorbs UV more efficiently or favoring lactose tolerance to be able to digest the sugars and vitamin D naturally found in milk. That’s why we look different from each other. Share it as much as you can and make people aware of truth.. Because knowledge can only save this beautiful world from ‘destruction’ which may cause from ‘discrimination’..

You can read more about the evolution of human face on the article given below:

https://theuncoverreality.wordpress.com/2020/10/05/why-your-face-looks-different-from-a-chimps-biology/

Copyright of this article totally belongs to uncover reality.. Author of this article is S. Aman.. One is allowed to use it only by giving proper credit to author and to us.

Neon River In Costa Rica Will Make You Ditch Instagram Filters (Amazing Places)

Imagine water so dazzling blue that when people see pictures of it, they usually accuse the photographers of digitally altering them. That’s exactly the case with the waterfall in Rio Celeste, a river in Costa Rica’s Tenorio Volcano National Park. If you’re wondering why this river is so stunningly neon despite having #NoFilter, the answer may surprise you: it’s a combination of volcanic minerals and bacteria.

Situated deep within the Costa Rican wilderness, Rio Celeste’s name translates to “heavenly river.” Local legend says that the river gets its iconic cerulean hue because after the gods supposedly painted the sky, they dipped their paintbrushes in its waters. Of course, we now know the real reason is a mixture of sulfur and calcium carbonate, which is found in the water due to the nearby Tenorio Volcano. Don’t worry, it’s been dormant for years.

To get there, you’ll have to hike about an hour through a tropical rainforest filled with white-faced monkeys, blue butterflies, poison dart frogs, sloths, and wildcats, among other exotic animals. After enjoying the view of the 300-foot waterfall, you can soak in one of the many nearby hot springs as the volcanic heat keeps you all warm and fuzzy. The best part? You’ll probably have this hidden oasis all to yourself! Because it’s located off the beaten path and takes quite a bit of effort to get there, there aren’t exactly crowds of people there at any given moment.

So if you’re a travel junkie with a bucket list that includes “visit a waterfall with water that’s bluer than a Smurf’s butt,” definitely consider paying a visit to Costa Rica’s Rio Celeste. You’ll especially enjoy it if you like hiking, ecotourism, and secluded serenity. Oh, and be sure to take lots of pictures. At the very least, we won’t accuse you of photoshopping them.

Did Our Ancestors Boil Their Food In Hot Springs? (Archeology)

A team led by researchers at MIT and the University of Alcalá in Spain has discovered evidence that hot springs may have existed in Olduvai Gorge around that time, near early human archaeological sites. The proximity of these hydrothermal features raises the possibility that early humans could have used hot springs as a cooking resource, for instance to boil fresh kills, long before humans are thought to have used fire as a controlled source for cooking.

The proximity of hot springs to early settlements have led researchers to wonder if early humans used hot springs as a cooking resource long before fire. Credit: Tom Björklund

In 2016, one of the author, named sistiaga joined an archaeological expedition to Olduvai Gorge, where researchers with the Olduvai Paleoanthropology and Paleoecology Project were collecting sediments from a 3-kilometer-long layer of exposed rock that was deposited around 1.7 million years ago. This geologic layer was striking because its sandy composition was markedly different from the dark clay layer just below, which was deposited 1.8 million years ago.

Ainara Sistiaga taking samples at Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids that existed 1.8 million years ago. Credit: Ainara Sistiaga

It’s thought that around 1.7 million years ago, East Africa underwent a gradual aridification, moving from a wetter, tree-populated climate to dryer, grassier terrain. Sistiaga brought back sandy rocks collected from the Olduvai Gorge layer and began to analyze them in Summons lab for signs of certain lipids that can contain residue of leaf waxes, offering clues to the kind of vegetation present at the time.

Within the sediments she brought back, Sistiaga came across lipids that looked completely different from the plant-derived lipids she knew. She took the data to Summons, who realized that they were a close match with lipids produced not by plants, but by specific groups of bacteria that he and his colleagues had reported on, in a completely different context, nearly 20 years ago.

The lipids that Sistiaga extracted from sediments deposited 1.7 million years ago in Tanzania were the same lipids that are produced by a modern bacteria that Summons and his colleagues previously studied in the United States, in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park.

One specific bacterium, Thermocrinis ruber, is a hyperthermophilic organism that will only thrive in very hot waters (around 80°C), such as those found in the outflow channels of boiling hot springs.

That is, it appears that heat-loving bacteria similar to those Summons had worked on more than 20 years ago in Yellowstone may also have lived in Olduvai Gorge 1.7 million years ago. By extension, the team proposes, high-temperature features such as hot springs and hydrothermal waters could also have been present.

The region where the team collected the sediments is adjacent to sites of early human habitation featuring stone tools, along with animal bones. It is possible, then, that nearby hot springs may have enabled hominins to cook food such as meat and certain tough tubers and roots.

Exactly how early humans may have cooked with hot springs is still an open question. They could have butchered animals and dipped the meat in hot springs to make them more palatable. In a similar way, they could have boiled roots and tubers, much like cooking raw potatoes, to make them more easily digestible. Animals could have also met their demise while falling into the hydrothermal waters, where early humans could have fished them out as a precooked meal.

While there is currently no sure-fire way to establish whether early humans indeed used hot springs to cook, the team plans to look for similar lipids, and signs of hydrothermal reservoirs, in other layers and locations throughout Olduvai Gorge, as well as near other sites in the world where human settlements have been found.

References: Ainara Sistiaga, Fatima Husain, David Uribelarrea, David M. Martín-Perea, Troy Ferland, Katherine H. Freeman, Fernando Diez-Martín, Enrique Baquedano, Audax Mabulla, Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo, and Roger E. Summons, “Microbial biomarkers reveal a hydrothermally active landscape at Olduvai Gorge at the dawn of the Acheulean, 1.7 Ma”, PNAS, 2020 doi: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004532117 link: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/09/14/2004532117